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A Strangeness in My Mind

A Strangeness in My Mind
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 9385890034
Pages: 624
Year: 2015-10-06
View: 1216
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Since his boyhood in a poor village in Central Anatolia, Mevlut Karatas has fantasized about what his life would become. Not getting as far in school as he'd hoped, at the age of twelve, he comes to Istanbul-"the center of the world"-and is immediately enthralled both by the city being demolished and the new one that is fast being built. He follows his father's trade, selling boza on the street, and hopes to become rich like other villagers who have settled on the desolate hills outside the booming metropolis. But chance seems to conspire against him. He spends three years writing love letters to a girl he saw just once at a wedding, only to elope by mistake with her sister. And though he grows to cherish his wife and the family they have, his relations all make their fortunes while his own years are spent in a series of jobs leading nowhere; he is sometimes attracted to the politics of his friends and intermittently to the lodge of a religious guide. But every evening, without fail, he still wanders the streets of Istanbul, selling boza and wondering at the "strangeness" in his mind, the sensation that makes him feel different from everyone else, until fortune conspires once more to let him understand at last what it is he has always yearned for. Told from the perspectives of many beguiling characters, A Strangeness in My Mind is a modern epic of coming of age in a great city, and a mesmerizing narrative sure to take its place among Pamuk's finest achievements.

A Strangeness in my Mind

A Strangeness in my Mind
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1101875836
Pages: 624
Year: 2015-10-20
View: 984
Read: 982

From the Nobel Prize winner and best-selling author of Snow and My Name Is Red: a soaring, panoramic new novel—his first since The Museum of Innocence—telling the unforgettable tale of an Istanbul street vendor and the love of his life. Since his boyhood in a poor village in Central Anatolia, Mevlut Karataş has fantasized about what his life would become. Not getting as far in school as he’d hoped, at the age of twelve he comes to Istanbul—“the center of the world”—and is immediately enthralled by both the old city that is disappearing and the new one that is fast being built. He follows his father’s trade, selling boza (a traditional mildly alcoholic Turkish drink) on the street, and hoping to become rich, like other villagers who have settled the desolate hills outside the booming metropolis. But luck never seems to be on Mevlut’s side. As he watches his relations settle down and make their fortunes, he spends three years writing love letters to a girl he saw just once at a wedding, only to elope by mistake with her sister. And though he grows to cherish his wife and the family they have, he stumbles toward middle age in a series of jobs leading nowhere. His sense of missing something leads him sometimes to the politics of his friends and intermittently to the teachings of a charismatic religious guide. But every evening, without fail, Mevlut still wanders the streets of Istanbul, selling boza and wondering at the “strangeness” in his mind, the sensation that makes him feel different from everyone else, until fortune conspires once more to let him understand at last what it is he has always yearned for. Told from different perspectives by a host of beguiling characters, A Strangeness in My Mind is a modern epic of coming of age in a great city, a brilliant tableau of life among the newcomers who have changed the face of Istanbul over the past fifty years. Here is a mesmerizing story of human longing, sure to take its place among Pamuk’s finest achievements.

A Strangeness in My Mind

A Strangeness in My Mind
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher: Random House India
ISBN: 9385890034
Pages: 624
Year: 2016-11-21
View: 1099
Read: 767

Since his boyhood in a poor village in Central Anatolia, Mevlut Karataş has fantasized about what his life would become. Not getting as far in school as he’d hoped, at the age of twelve he comes to Istanbul—“the center of the world”—and is immediately enthralled by both the old city that is disappearing and the new one that is fast being built. He follows his father’s trade, selling boza (a traditional, mildly alcoholic Turkish drink) on the street, hoping to become rich like the other villagers who have settled on the desolate hills outside the booming metropolis. But luck never seems to be on Mevlut’s side. He spends three years writing love letters to a girl he saw just once at a wedding, only to elope by mistake with her sister. And though he grows to cherish his wife and the family they have, he stumbles toward middle age in a series of jobs leading nowhere. His sense of missing something leads him sometimes to the politics of his friends and intermittently to the teachings of a charismatic religious guide. But every evening, without fail, Mevlut still wanders the streets of Istanbul, selling boza and wondering at the “strangeness” in his mind, the sensation that makes him feel different from everyone else, until fortune conspires once more to let him understand at last what it is he has always yearned for. Told from different perspectives by a host of beguiling characters, A Strangeness in My Mind is a modern epic of coming of age in a great city, a brilliant tableau of life among the newcomers who have changed the face of Istanbul over the past fifty years. Here is a mesmerizing story of human longing, sure to take its place among Pamuk’s finest achievements.

The Red Haired Woman

The Red Haired Woman
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher: Bentang Pustaka
ISBN: 6022914493
Pages: 352
Year: 2018-02-28
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Istanbul

Istanbul
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher:
ISBN: 0571227538
Pages: 368
Year: 2005
View: 1221
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The celebrated novelist Orhan Pamuk explores his idea of Istanbul, mingling personal memoir with cultural history to evoke his home of fifty years. After the Ottoman Empire collapsed, the world almost forgot that Istanbul existed. The city into which I was born was poorer, shabbier, and more isolated than it had ever been its two-thousand-year history. For me it has always been a city of ruins and of end-of-empire melancholy. I've spent my life either battling with this melancholy, or (like all Istanbullus) making it my own . . . For Orhan the day-dreaming child, the heart of the great teeming city of Istanbul was the building known as 'Pamuk Apartments', where each branch of his large and extended family occupied its own separate floor. Now the writer Orhan Pamuk, with his unique sense of history and extraordinary gift for narrative, revisits his own family's secrets and idiosyncracies, discovering what made them typical of their time and place. And as he companionably guides us through Istanbul's monuments and lost paradises, its dilapidated Ottoman villas, back streets and waterways, he also introduces us to the city's writers, artists and murderers. In a beautiful and quite riveting fashion, Pamuk transforms the form of autobiography, and what begins as a portrait of the artist as a young man becomes a portrait of an extraordinary city.

The Black Book

The Black Book
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 146688763X
Pages: 400
Year: 2014-12-16
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The Black Book is a stunning tapestry of Middle Eastern and Islamic culture which confirms Orhan Pamuk's reputation as a writer of international stature, comparable to Borges and Calvino. Galip is an Istanbul lawyer, and his wife, Ruya, has vanished. Could she be hiding out with her half brother, Jelal, a newspaper columnist whose fame Galip envies? And if so, why isn't anyone in Jelal's flat? As Galip plays the part of private investigator, he assumes the identity of Jelal himself, wearing his clothes, answering his phone calls, even faking his wry columns, which he passes off as the work of the missing journalist. But the amateur sleuth bungles his undercover operation, and with dire consequences. Richly atmospheric and Rabelaisian in scope, The Black Book is a labyrinthine novel suffused with the sights, sounds, and scents of Istanbul. An unforgettable evocation of the city where East meets West, The Black Book is a boldly unconventional mystery that plumbs the elusive nature of identity, fiction, interpretation, and reality.

Other Colors

Other Colors
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher: Vintage Canada
ISBN: 0307370828
Pages: 464
Year: 2010-10-22
View: 188
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Knopf Canada is proud to welcome Orhan Pamuk to the list with an inspiring and engaging collection of essays on literary and personal subjects–his first new book since winning the Nobel Prize. In the three decades that Pamuk has devoted to writing fiction, he has also produced scores of witty, moving and provocative essays and articles. Here is a thoughtful compilation of a dazzling novelist’s best non-fiction, offering different perspectives on his lifelong obsessions. Pamuk’s criticism, autobiographical writing and meditations are presented alongside interviews he has given and selections from his private notebooks. He engages the work of other novelists, including Sterne and Dostoyevsky, Salman Rushdie and Patricia Highsmith, and he discusses his own books and writing process. We learn not just how he writes but how he lives as he recounts his successful struggle to quit smoking and describes his relationship with his daughter. Ordinary events–applying for a passport, the death of a relative–inspire extraordinary flights of association as the novelist reflects on everything from the child’s state of being to divergent attitudes towards art in the East and West. Illustrated with photographs, paintings and the author’s own sketches, Other Colors gives us Orhan Pamuk’s world through a kaleidoscope whose brilliant, shifting themes and moods together become a radiant and meaningful whole. From the Hardcover edition.

The Naive and the Sentimental Novelist

The Naive and the Sentimental Novelist
Author: Orhan Pamuk, Nazim Dikbaş
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674050762
Pages: 200
Year: 2010-11-01
View: 248
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Nobel prize winning Orhan Pamuk takes us on a journey into the worlds of readers and writers through the lens of his own life. Pamuk’s very personal, autobiographical stories explain how he came to reading and writing. As someone who started out as a painter in his early twenties, Pamuk approaches his discussion of the novel with a strong visual sense. Explaining that readers and writers need to be both naïve and sentimental, he looks back to his early years and the varied works that inspired him, including writers such as Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Stendhal, Flaubert, Proust, Mann, and Naipaul.

Snow

Snow
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher: Faber & Faber
ISBN: 0571268390
Pages: 448
Year: 2011-07-21
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Snow begins in the year 1992. Ka, a poet and political exile, returns to Turkey as a journalist, assigned to investigate troubling reports of suicide in the small and mysterious city of Kars on the Turkish border. The snow is falling fast as he arrives, and soon all roads are closed. There's a 'suicide epidemic' amongst young religious women forbidden to wear their headscarves. Islamists are poised to win the local elections and Ka is falling in love with the beautiful and radiant Ipek, now recently divorced. Amid blanketing snowfall and universal suspicion, he finds himself pursued by terrorism in a city wasting away under the shadow of Europe. In the midst of growing religious and political violence, the stage is set for a terrible and desperate act . . . Touching, slyly comic, and humming with cerebral suspense, Snow evokes the spiritual fragility of the non-Western world, its ambivalence about the godless West, and its fury. 'A novel of profound relevance to our present moment' The Times

The Strangler Vine

The Strangler Vine
Author: M.J. Carter
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698168739
Pages: 384
Year: 2015-03-31
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A FINALIST FOR THE EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL A WASHINGTON POST NOTABLE BOOK OF 2015 LONGLISTED FOR THE BAILEYS WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION 2014 Set in the untamed wilds of nineteenth-century colonial India, a dazzling historical thriller introducing an unforgettable investigative pair. India, 1837: William Avery is a young soldier with few prospects except rotting away in campaigns in India; Jeremiah Blake is a secret political agent gone native, a genius at languages and disguises, disenchanted with the whole ethos of British rule, but who cannot resist the challenge of an unresolved mystery. What starts as a wild goose chase for this unlikely pair—trying to track down a missing writer who lifts the lid on Calcutta society—becomes very much more sinister as Blake and Avery get sucked into the mysterious Thuggee cult and its even more ominous suppression. There are shades of Heart of Darkness, sly references to Conan Doyle, that bring brilliantly to life the India of the 1830s with its urban squalor, glamorous princely courts and bazaars, and the ambiguous presence of the British overlords—the officers of the East India Company—who have their own predatory ambitions beyond London's oversight. From the Hardcover edition.

The Innocence of Objects

The Innocence of Objects
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher: Harry N. Abrams
ISBN: 1419704567
Pages: 264
Year: 2012-10-01
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Presents a catalog of the items on display at Istanbul's Museum of Innocence, an establishment that houses ordinary objects drawn from Pamuk's 2008 novel bearing the same name.

Clockwork Phoenix 5

Clockwork Phoenix 5
Author: Jason Kimble, Rachael K. Jones , Patricia Russo , Marie Brennan , Benjanun Sriduangkaew , Rob Cameron , A.C. Wise , Gray Rinehart , Sam Fleming , Sunil Patel , C.S.E. Cooney, Carlos Hernandez , Holly Heisey , Barbara Krasnoff , Sonya Taaffe , Alex Dally MacFarlane , Shveta Thakrar , Cassandra Khaw , Keffy R.M. Kehrli , Rich Larson , Beth Cato
Publisher: Mythic Delirium Books
ISBN:
Pages: 274
Year: 2016-04-05
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2016 Locus Recommended Reading List, Best Anthology Contains “Sabbath Wine” by Barbara Krasnoff, 2016 Nebula Award finalist for Best Short Story “Allen’s strange and lovely fifth genre-melding fantasy anthology selects 20 new short stories of unusual variety, texture, compassion, and perception. . . . All the stories afford thought-provoking glimpses into alternative realities that linger, sparking unconventional thoughts, long after they are first encountered.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review “The arrangement is superb. This anthology of 20 stories can resemble a symphony of themes and variations in a wide range of keys, or a tapestry whose elements form patterns of imagery and meaning that shift and offer new insights throughout the book.” —Locus The Clockwork Phoenix anthologies offer homes to “well-written stories occupying multiple subgenres, usually in the same story, often ambiguously,” as Locus Magazine once put it. The ground-breaking, boundary-pushing, award-nominated series has returned for a fifth incarnation, triumphantly risen from the ashes after another successful Kickstarter campaign. This is the largest installment yet, holding twenty new tales of beauty and strangeness. With original fiction from Jason Kimble, Rachael K. Jones, Patricia Russo, Marie Brennan, Benjanun Sriduangkaew, Rob Cameron, A. C. Wise, Gray Rinehart, Sam Fleming, Sunil Patel, C. S. E. Cooney and Carlos Hernandez, Holly Heisey, Barbara Krasnoff, Sonya Taaffe, Alex Dally MacFarlane, Shveta Thakrar, Cassandra Khaw, Keffy R. M. Kehrli, Rich Larson, and Beth Cato. Cover art by Paula Arwen Owen. “And then there is that secret restaurant . . . It is perfection on a plate! And you feel better about yourself and your life and the world every time you go there. Clockwork Phoenix is the name of this restaurant, and Mike Allen is the restaurateur. One sublime dish after another, and yet I still have my favorites that I keep coming back to.” —Little Red Reviewer Table of contents: “The Wind at His Back” by Jason Kimble “The Fall Shall Further the Flight in Me” by Rachael K. Jones “The Perfect Happy Family” by Patricia Russo “The Mirror-City” by Marie Brennan “The Finch’s Wedding and the Hive That Sings” by Benjanun Sriduangkaew “Squeeze” by Rob Cameron “A Guide to Birds by Song (After Death)” by A.C. Wise “The Sorcerer of Etah” by Gray Rinehart “The Prime Importance of a Happy Number” by Sam Fleming “Social Visiting” by Sunil Patel “The Book of May” by C.S.E. Cooney and Carlos Hernandez “The Tiger’s Silent Roar” by Holly Heisey “Sabbath Wine” by Barbara Krasnoff “The Trinitite Golem” by Sonya Taaffe “Two Bright Venuses” by Alex Dally MacFarlane “By Thread of Night and Starlight Needle” by Shveta Thakrar “The Games We Play” by Cassandra Khaw “The Road, and the Valley, and the Beasts” by Keffy R.M. Kehrli “Innumerable Glimmering Lights” by Rich Larson “The Souls of Horses” by Beth Cato

How the French Think

How the French Think
Author: Sudhir Hazareesingh
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465061664
Pages: 352
Year: 2015-09-22
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In France, perhaps more so than anywhere else, intellectual activity is a way of life embraced by the majority of society, not just a small group of élite thinkers. And because French thought has also shaped the Western world, Sudhir Hazareesingh argues in How the French Think, we cannot hope to understand modern history without first making sense of the French mind-set. Hazareesingh traces the evolution of French thought from Descartes and Rousseau to Sartre and Derrida. In the French intellectual tradition, he shows, recurring themes have pervaded nearly every aspect of French life, from the rhetorical flair once embodied by the philosophes to the country's modern embrace of secularism. Sweeping aside generalizations and easy stereotypes, Hazareesingh offers an erudite portrait of the venerated tradition of French thought and the people who embody it.

The White Castle

The White Castle
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 8184750749
Pages: 168
Year: 2015-10-14
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In the seventeenth century, a young Italian scholar sailing from Venice to Naples is taken prisoner and delivered to Constantinople, into the custody of a scholar known as Hoja—‘master’—a man who is his exact double. Hoja wonders, given the knowledge of each other’s most intimate secrets, if they could actually exchange identities. Set in a world of magnificent scholarship and terrifying savagery, The White Castle is a colourful and intricately patterned triumph of the imagination.

Silent House

Silent House
Author: Orhan Pamuk
Publisher: Knopf Canada
ISBN: 0307402673
Pages: 320
Year: 2012-10-09
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In an old mansion in Cennethisar (formerly a fishing village, now a posh resort near Istanbul) the old widow Fatma awaits the annual summer visit of her grandchildren: Faruk, a dissipated failed historian; his sensitive leftist sister, Nilgun; and the younger grandson, Metin, a high school student drawn to the fast life of the nouveaux riches, who dreams of going to America. The widow has lived in the village for decades, ever since her husband, an idealistic young doctor, first arrived to serve the poor fishermen. Now mostly bedridden, she is attended by her faithful servant Recep, a dwarf--and the doctor's illegitimate son. Mistress and servant share memories, and grievances, of those early years. But it is Recep's cousin Hassan, a high school dropout, and fervent right-wing nationalist, who will draw the visiting family into the growing political cataclysm, in this spell-binding novel depicting Turkey's tumultuous century-long struggle for modernity. Translated by Robert Finn

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